Something Underground take over Nissi’s

Denver-based Something Underground played to a sold-out audience at Nissi’s in Lafayette Friday, Oct. 19. The power trio, famed for their roots-rock and reggae style, gave a worthwhile performance that left their fans and family in attendance wanting more.

The trio, consisting of guitarist and singer Seth Larson, his brother Joshua  on bass and vocals and drummer Trevor Mariotti, started the evening with a mellow tone.

From left to right, brothers Joshua and Seth Larson of Something Underground rock out with indulgence to their song “She’s On Fire.” The band performed at Nissi’s in Lafayette, CO Friday night. (Kyle Ward/CU Independent)
The frontmen Seth and Joshua’s synchronized bond, forged by brotherhood, left me with a resonating impression. They undoubtedly showed a unique gift for timing and tightness that became relevant the moment I entered the venue.

Beginning with an acoustic set, the trio performed songs like ” You Would Never Know” and “Only Exception.” They captivated the crowd through their intimate grooves and melodic discourse timed by Mariotti’s strong in-the-pocket performance on the percussion.

As their acoustic set ended, the band’s family and friends sat back while eager fans rushed up to the trio. Seth made his way through the waves of hugs and high fives before Dave Avery, Something Underground’s devoted roadie and handy man, quickly grabbed him and lead us to the back room.

Between sets, Seth explained the importance the band’s fans have on their music and live act.

“The performance is an energy loop,” Seth said. “We are never the entire show. The show is always a combination of us, the energy of the venue, and mostly the people that are there.

“It’s our intention to create and perform the best music that resonates with us, that is healing to us…that other people can really connect to, and then really take that music to as many people on the planet,” he continued.

For the second set, Something Underground ignited with a loud electric mash of funk and reggae riffs. The cohesion among the trio immediately set in as they turned up the dial on their performance. Taking the crowd by harmonizing force, the brothers layered melodies and groovy rock verses that showed hints of pop influence.

The atmosphere shifted through the songs and slowly heated up the band’s movement around the stage. Mariotti delved deep into the beat as Joshua and Seth hysterically jammed with an almost gymnastic-like athleticism. Seth began manipulating his hair into a whip and tested the bend in his spinal column while Joshua appeared to be heaving his bass excessively and playing backup rhythm with his entire body.

The change to stand up instruments showcased their diversity and strengths while leading into their funky hit “She’s on Fire”. The song transformed Nissi’s into a sweltering dance fest that nearly brought the venue to its knees.

Something Underground’s sound began the night as a cluster of grooving harmonies that pulled from reggae, rock and pop. Throughout the evening it was made clear that their mix of familiar genres would evolve into something bigger.

Their hyperactive athleticism gave the audience their money’s worth and satisfied my cravings for a more physical experience. Applause capped the performance that called for the trio to personally thank everyone in attendance. If these guys from Denver could set the bar this high, the possibilities of bigger things erupting seemed inevitable.

You can catch Something Underground on Dec. 1 at Dickens Opera House in Longmont. They will be recording the performance, attempting to capture an experience that must be had in person. Check your expectations at the door because these guys won’t be something underground for long.

Contact CU Independent Staff Writer Kyle Ward at Kyle.ward-1@colorado.edu.

About Kyle Ward

Hailing from Santa Cruz, CA, Kyle rides fast, lives hard, and never stops. His pursuit for the truth and excitement fuels his passion for Honest Journalism and drives him to continue his passion for equality and adventure. In his spare time he trains for Trail Running, pushes his tolerance for endurance sports, attempts to dominate the Boulder Foosball scene, makes noise from strings, and tries to go as hard as he can for as long as he can.

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